BusyBox – The Swiss Army Knife of Embedded Linux

UNIX Command 

$dpkg -L busybox
/.
/bin
/bin/busybox
/usr
/usr/share
/usr/share/man
/usr/share/man/man1
/usr/share/man/man1/busybox.1.gz
/usr/share/doc
/usr/share/doc/busybox
/usr/share/doc/busybox/copyright
/usr/share/doc/busybox/changelog.Debian.gz
$mount
/dev/sda1 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)
tmpfs on /lib/init/rw type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,size=5242880,mode=755,size=5242880,mode=755)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,size=10%,mode=755,size=10%,mode=755)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
udev on /dev type tmpfs (rw,mode=0755)
tmpfs on /run/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,size=20%,mode=1777,size=20%,mode=1777)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=620,gid=5,mode=620)
fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
binfmt_misc on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
$busybox mount
rootfs on / type rootfs (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,relatime,size=991460k,nr_inodes=2478100,mode=755)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,size=199580k,mode=755)
/dev/disk/by-uuid/26cca090-8a72-4443-859f-7a67b7188357 on / type ext3 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,commit=5,barrier=1,data=ordered)
tmpfs on /lib/init/rw type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,relatime,size=5120k,mode=755)
tmpfs on /run/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=399156k)
fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw,relatime)
binfmt_misc on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
$

UNIX Explanation

BusyBox combines tiny versions of many common UNIX utilities into a
single  small executable. It  provides minimalist  replacements for
most  of the  utilities you  usually find  in GNU  coreutils, util-
linux, etc.  The utilities in BusyBox generally  have fewer options
than their full-featured GNU cousins; however, the options that are
included provide  the expected  functionality and behave  very much
like their GNU counterparts.

Why ?


BusyBox  has  been   written  with  size-optimization  and  limited
resources in mind.  It is  also extremely modular so you can easily
include  or exclude commands  (or features)  at compile  time. This
makes  it easy  to customize  your  embedded systems.  To create  a
working system, just  add /dev, /etc, and a  Linux kernel.  BusyBox
provides  a fairly  complete  POSIX environment  for  any small  or
embedded system.

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